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Archive for the ‘food and wine’ Category

What to do with all that rhubarb: rhubarb ketchup

Posted by deborahmclaren on October 27, 2011

I grew so much rhubarb this summer I didn’t know what to do with all of it. I made cakes, pies, breads, tarts, and crisps and finally chopped up the last of it and stuck it in the freezer – waiting to find yet another way to use all that stuff. It’s great rhubarb – fantastically tasty – its just that I had so much!

Last weekend my inner farm girl went wild and I tried to buy up all of the last tomatoes at the St. Paul Farmer’s Market. It was a lovely day. Kind of cool and brisk. One of those times when the day itself infuses you with so much energy you feel like you can cook up a truck load of veggies. My husband, Rob, was going along with it. He actually pushed around one of those pop-up mesh toy cans on a dolly and helped me fill it to the brim. It trembled and flopped side to side under the weight of garlic, potatoes, carrots, bok choy, onions, peppers, and ALL THOSE TOMATOES.

I have not really canned this fall, so I was on a mission to buy stuff I could quickly can or preserve through the winter. Once this summer my son Anil and I had lunch at Wise Acre Eatery in Minneapolis. Luckily he ordered a hamburger that came with fries and ketchup. The ketchup was to die for. Fortunately I was able to get some of the secret ingredients out of the waiter. The memory of that delicious red sauce inspired my tomato hunt.

Rhubarb.

cooking the rhubarb and tomatoes

That’s the secret ingredient chef Beth Fisher uses in her tasty sauce. We love Wise Acre Eatery for a number of reasons – it is a garden nursery and a slow food eatery in south Minneapolis – and they grow their own food on a farm not far from the Twin Cities… Berkshire Black hogs, Scottish Highland cattle, free range chickens… all rambling around on fresh green pastures in the nearby countryside. Of course it sounds overly sweet when you first hear about it (the ketchup, not the farm and eatery) but its not.

I had to go home and google up every rhubarb ketchup recipe on the internet and call a couple of go-to cooks I know. After experimenting a bit, the final result included vinegar and brown sugar – staples of any good ketchup recipe. Also, I used that boat load of Roma tomatoes along with the last of the heirloom tomatoes I had picked from the garden.

So if you have a bunch of rhubarb left over from the summer harvest and you’re out at the farmer’s market (or on the farm) this week you still have time to find a few good tomatoes (friends and family in the south will laugh at this – since I’m just about as far north as the US gets in Minnesota and thus at the end of the tomato season). Here’s the recipe I finally came up with. My friend Carla Solberg Sherman, the owner of Como Lake B&B, said she could serve it with the eggs she dishes up at her elegant place on Como Lake.

I hope you like it. Here’s the recipe:

Rhubarb Ketchup
Takes about an hour to make
Ingredients

4 cups diced fresh or frozen rhubarb
3 medium onions, chopped
1 cup white vinegar
1 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup sugar
1 dozen roma tomatoes, diced or
1 (28 ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon pickling spice

Directions

In a large saucepan, combine all ingredients. Cook for 1 hour or until thick. Cool. Refrigerate in covered containers or freeze it.

Posted in Buy-local, food and wine, Minnesota, Saint Paul, Slow Foods, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

I’m Going to Kansas City… here we come!

Posted by deborahmclaren on October 2, 2011

directly in front of negro league and jazz mus...

Image via Wikipedia

I’m going to Kansas City, Kansas City here I come! BBQ, Baseball and Jazz… I’m going to get me some!

This summer I drove down to KC with nine of my most  immediate family. We loaded into two vans and headed south from the Twin Cities to Kansas City. On the hottest day of the year. Really! It was 102 degrees and one of the vans did not have a/c.  Our mission: find the best KC barbeque and visit the birthplace of KC jazz and black baseball.

Before you read further I will admit to a few of things. I got the hives from the heat and had to stay in bed almost 48 hours. My mostly Muslim family went to Worlds of Fun/Oceans of Fun without me (still in bed) and were unindated by Christian music which was constantly (and loudly) broadcast throughout the amusement park. No worries about those carnies that love blasting Slow Ride here. And we did not find the best bbq in Kansas City. Despite that, we found some real gems in KC. This information is from my accumulated experiences though.

My husband, Rob, and I have been exploring KC for a few years. Every time we travel South to visit my family we go through KC (and Joplin but that’s an entirely different story). For a long time it was just a gas stop or an overnight cheap hotel on the way to Oklahoma (or that five hours we spent in a snow storm waiting it out at Chuckie Cheese). Finally we started making time for… you guessed it… food and music. That is what life is about, right?

One night we were driving through KC just about supper time. Rob had been trying to find a good steak house every time we passed through town without luck. We gave up on the steaks and decided to go for my favorite type of southern dinner – BBQ.  I grew up in the south so BBQ often means really soft meat sans the spicy ketchup sauce. The meat is smoked, melts in your mouth and the taste can’t be hidden by any kind of sauce. So of course I was hoping to find that. My husband, having been born and raised in India, prefers as spicy as you can get. We always try to find a happy medium (and an extra bottle of hot sauce).

With my new cell phone and all its fancy apps I was able to track down the closest BBQ place we were passing by on the highway. Happened to be BB’s Lawnside Blues and BBQ.  “B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ is Where BBQ Meets the Blues in Kansas City. For 20 years, B.B.’s has served slow-smoked meats (sausage, beef, chicken, pulled pork and ribs) from its 60+ year-old pit, Plus, B.B.’s menu includes signature Louisiana dishes like gumbo, jambalaya, red beans & rice and goulash. And, when you combine that with world-class blues entertainment, you get a unique Kansas City experience only found at B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ.” Yep, that’s right off their website but it certainly sums it up.

We drove a few miles through a deserted industrial area to get there, and yes, there is some kind of piece of grass next door to the parking lot. It’s a bit of a stretch to call it “lawnside,” but maybe in that area it passes. The inside is pretty much that scene from the Blues Brothers, where Jake and Elwood have to play in a honky tonk behind some chain link fencing and everyone throws empty beer bottles at them. Fortunately for us there were no crazy crowd or chain fences, nor flying beer bottles, just great food and amazing blues. There was a band of at least 10, including a hot horn section, and at one point two members of the band ran into the audience and did a great chest bump in the middle of a tune. Obviously a lot of energy and entertainment goes on at BB’s Lawnside. Great homestyle BBQ, long shared tables, awesome local brew and amazing music. And it was all very reasonably priced.

During our visits to KC we had learned about The Historic District of 18th and Vine.  The district was the center for black culture and life in Kansas City from the late 1800s-1960s. Since the late 1990s it has been undergoing a revival. It was the hub of activity for homeowners, business, jazz music, and baseball enthusiast. Just outside of the district stands the Paseo YMCA building, which was built as a black YMCA in 1914. It served as temporary home for baseball players, railroad workers, and others making the transition to big city life in the Midwest. It was here that the Negro National League was founded in 1920. Although the district and the YMCA building were becoming blighted by the 1980s, they were recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the late 1990s, plans were underway by city officials to create a new home to showcase Kansas City’s jazz heritage and to revitalize the Historic District. City officials and the mayor worked to raise over $20 million in bonds to build a new facility to host the new American Jazz Museum and a new, permanent and expanded, home for the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum. This new 50,000 square-foot building opened in September 1997 and the Baseball Museum opened in November.

Hot jazz, cool blues, historical and cultural preservation and good food.   Just east of downtown KC. We took the kids to the baseball museum and the American Jazz Museum which showcases the sights and sounds of jazz through interactive exhibits and films, the Changing Gallery exhibit space, Horace M. Peterson III Visitors Center, Blue Room jazz club and Gem Theater. Kansas City is one of the greatest purveyors of jazz – and it continues to offer fertile ground for the music to thrive.

The kids were excited by the museums. The Jazz Museum, especially, is very interactive. Numerous kiosks use individual headphones to tell stories about the musicians, various types of jazz, and historical eras of jazz music. I could have spent a lot more time there as there was so much to absorb and learn.  However, we were off to find food for a hungry crowd.

The original Arthur Bryants in the historic jazz district

Although Arthur Bryant’s was recommended by everyone in the neighborhood, I think it’s a taste acquired by growing up there. The BBQ sauce was vinegary with some lumpy dry spices in it. Have no doubt – the place was packed and there are tons of great reviews about the place (although there have been more unfavorable reviews of late – maybe they are focusing more on their product sales than their restaurant food?) It just wasn’t my type of barbeque. And everyone else in the family agreed. And the family includes some heavy duty BBQ connoisseurs. It is a well loved, neighborhood favorite, it just wasn’t what we were expecting.  To order you must wait in line and order in a cafeteria style set-up. It was rather confusing but we ended up with burnt ends, turkey and fries.

Other places in the 18th and Vine area include Danny’s Big Easy, The Peachtree, the KC Blues & Jazz Juke House, and The Blue Room (part of the American Jazz Museum) which hosts Jazz Poetry Jams every 3rd Tuesday from 7 to 10pm. Other nights they offer up live music starting at 7 pm. The 2011 Rhythm and Ribs Jazz and Blues Festival is coming up on Oct 8.

The next night we tried Jack Stack’s BBQ near the river. The beef ribs were meaty and tender and the sauce was definitely a thick tomato and brown sugar base. The staff at the crowded restaurant was kind enough to set us in a huge booth area where we could all sit together (and not offend other diners with all of our noise and active kiddies).

There aren’t a lot of locally-owned accommodations in Kansas City – or at least we weren’t able to find them. There are a couple of B&Bs in nearby Bonner Springs.  Airbnb lists a few places to stay: from a one bedroom rental in a private home for $40 a night to luxury Lofts downtown for $90 a night.  With three adults and six kids under twelve we opted for a downtown hotel with two rooms and a pool. And we used that pool a lot since it was such a hot weekend. Unfortunately, a lot of b&bs don’t allow children.

Since we were downtown we were close to the restored Union Station (with lots of food, a permanent rail exhibit called the KC Rail Experience, exhibit spaces for traveling exhibits produced by the Smithsonian and other national organizations, a planetarium, an interactive science center called Science City and a vibrant Theater District featuring giant-screen movies and live theater, and much more.) and the Crowne Center which houses a Children’s Theater, the Hallmark Card headquarters (where kids can go to make crafts), a huge Crayola store also with fun activities, play areas (shooting water outside, an Amazon rainforest inside), and plenty of shops to buy any kind of KC BBQ sauce there is.

Also downtown, along the river, is the City Market. Since its inception in 1857, the City Market continues to be one of the largest and most enduring public farmers’ markets in the Midwest, linking growers and small businesses to the Kansas City community. This is where locals go! The City Market is one of the largest outdoor concert venues in Kansas City. There are a number of permanent vendors in the market, and more than 140 vendors on the weekends during the farmer’s market that burst with bedding plants, fruits, vegetables, herbs, fresh baked goods and other sweets, cut flowers and crafts made by local artisans.

We’re going to keep hunting for local places to stay. Please let me know if you have more local haunts to add to our KC stopovers!

Posted in Buy-local, cultural heritage, family travel, food and wine, Missouri, museum, travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Building the Local Flavor website

Posted by deborahmclaren on September 29, 2011

I’ve been working with Envision, in St. Peter MN, to design the new Local Flavor website. Building a website is not easy… it takes a lot of time, tinkering and learning. The website will eventually include a LOCAL directory of entrepreneurs, microenterprises, small businesses, festivals and events, and more. Say you don’t want to stay at a big chain hotel and drive thru that McPlace next time you travel around Minnesota. Local Flavor will help you find a very cool local inn to stay, places to visit, interesting things to do and great local, healthy food wherever you go. And Local Flavor is not just for travelers! Locals will find it very useful too.

It’s taking longer than I thought. Hopefully the website will be ready for “testing” in the next couple of weeks. Anyone that wants to volunteer to test will get a free one year subscription! You’ll have to help test and report any problems or bugs you might experience. We want to make sure the website will work well.

In the meantime, please help by voting for Local Flavor. There’s only a couple more days and your vote can help us win a $50,000 Intuit hiring grant and provide more jobs in Minnesota. Click on the Intuit website and type in “Local Flavor” and then “St. Paul, MN” which will bring up the voting box. Then vote for us. Write something nice about us if you’d like.

Thanks for staying in touch and reading the blog this summer. I’m so surprised there’s been a lot of visits despite my lack of writing. Hopefully I can get back into the groove soon.

Cheers! – Travel Momma

Posted in Buy-local, entreprenuers, family travel, food and wine, Minnesota, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Black Salt or Kala Namak from India

Posted by deborahmclaren on July 23, 2011

Indian spice

Image via Wikipedia

I wrote about this back in January and it has been a popular post since then. Finally I decided to buy some quality black salt and make it available on ebay and etsy.

Favorite new spice! Indian black salt comes from the Himalayan Mountains and has been used for centuries in Indian cuisine as cooking and finishing salt. In addition to the supreme taste it also has some exceptional health benefits. In India black salt is recommended for people with high blood pressure and to people who are on low-salt diets, because it is lower in sodium and does not increase sodium content in the blood. It is also know for comforting intestinal gas and heartburn. It is believed to help with indigestion. It is also considered a cooling spice in ayurvedic medicine which uses this salt as a digestive. Great on: yogurt and cheese. Exceptional on summer favorites such as cucumbers, watermelon and mangoes.

High quality spice from Travel Momma (we’re foodies!)

Find black salt on etsy

or ebay

Posted in food and wine, spice, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Traveling in New Zealand

Posted by deborahmclaren on April 17, 2011

Hold down the fort! Travel Momma is on a lovely adventure down under – researching and writing a bunch of cool stories about buy-local, 100% Pure New Zealand adventures, the whole new farmer’s markets push around the country, manuka honey, a star sanctuary, and sheep… yes, lots of sheep.

I’ll be home next week.

Posted in family travel, food and wine, green travel, Indigenous tourism, Kiwis, New Zealand, quite unusual, sacred sites, travel, travel writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

2011 Minnesota CSA Farm Directory available

Posted by deborahmclaren on March 4, 2011

2011 CSA Farm Directory

Time to find your CSA (community supported agriculture) farm delivery to ensure a nice, fresh box of goodies arrives for you each week this summer. There are dozens of farms listed in the new 2011 CSA Farm Directory!

The website includes information about each farm and a map with drop-off sites.

CSAs deliver everything from eggs, lip balm, honey, flowers, organic and heirloom vegetables, to tasty broiler chickens, salsas, pickles, lamb, jam, artisan dough breads, gluten-free baked goods and grass fed beef.

Some CSAs host member events – festivals, hootenannies, gardening, slow foods dinners, garlic festivals, corn feeds, wine tastings, walks in the woods, bonfires, hay rides, farm tours, camping, barn dances and opportunities to reconnect with the land – forests, prairies, creeks, and animals.

Check out the directory for the CSA that fits your needs. CSA farms are dedicated to healthy, fresh foods and a better planet.

Posted in Buy-local, food and wine, Minnesota, Slow Foods | 1 Comment »

Gourmet chocolate, bone jewelry, vegan clothes and other cool ideas for Valentine’s Day

Posted by deborahmclaren on February 5, 2011

According to new economic predictions, Americans will spend more on Valentine’s Day this year. Amazing amounts really – almost $2.7 million! It would probably be more if Valentine’s Day was on a weekend, this year it falls on a Monday.  Think of all the sweet things we can do for our loved ones and communities if we buy-local or take a local/stay-cation! I’ve got some great ideas, but first look at the statistics:

“Consumers will be spending 5.7 percent more than last year on romantic getaways for Valentine’s Day in 2011, significantly improving upon 2009′s flat spending results, according to industry research firm IBIS World.”

Valentine's Day Spending
“Travel is the third most popular spend category for Valentine’s Day, with $2.16 billion in projected spend for 11.6 percent of the total.” And, according to another survey by the National Retail Federation, this is the first Valentine’s Day since 2008 where couples plan to spend more on each other than the year before. This year, couples will spend an average of $68.98 on their spouse or significant other.
First let’s look at greeting cards. Hand made cards are more romantic and personal than bought ones. Creating beautiful home made Valentine’s Day cards is easy. If you’re not crafty you can use a photo or even bake a giant cookie. Love notes are treasured forever. If you’re not a poet, tuck in a “coupon” that your love can redeem now or later (massage, picnic and wine under the stars, a romantic weekend getaway, cuddly movie night, whatever makes you happy). If a home made card is not your thing, find a local artist.  Etsy.com is a great place to find cards and other gifts that are made by real people, often in your own area. Here’s a lovely example of a hand crafted card that says I love you in 14 languages!

I Love You Card by riricreations in Richmond, VA (etsy.com)

Etsy.com has lots of other crafts, jewelry, etc. Check out this cute Little Wood Valentine Monster by Little Wood People in Buffalo, NY.

Little Wood Monster by Little Wood People, Buffalo, NY
Valentine Chocolates! With so many locally-made gourmet chocolates these days its easy to find traditional and exciting new recipes – especially organic fair-trade chocolate. I love chocolates that include spicy chilies. The Rogue Chocolatier, in Minneapolis, is the first true artisan chocolate maker to arrive in the Upper Midwest. The Sambirano bar, made with cacao from a single family-owned estate in Madagascar, was a winner of the 2010 Good Food Awards! One man bean-to-bar chocolate making!

Jewels for your valentine? Make sure to find a local artist that makes jewelry and avoid jeweler chains. Looks for artist co-ops, art fairs, and locally-owned clothing stores that sell jewelry.  Albany, NY artist, Corrina Goutos, combines her love for jewelry, sustainable living and veganism in her new line of jewelry: Vegan Bone Jewelry, part of Gilding the Lily, a nation-wide contemporary jewelry design company. She makes all the Jewelry by hand and is committed to employing recycled materials and sustainable found art into every piece she makes.

A rose is a rose! NOT. VeriFlora® is America’s first comprehensive sustainability certification program for the floral and potted plant industries. The VeriFlora® “Certified Sustainably Grown” label is your guarantee that flowers and potted plants have been produced in an environmentally and socially responsible manner and meet the highest standards for freshness and quality. When you choose a VeriFlora® product, you are contributing to a global movement to encourage companies to become sustainable. Already, this has resulted in significant and positive change for farmers, farm workers, and the environment. Organic Bouquet, the largest online provider of eco-friendly and organic floral gifts in the US. They also provide gift baskets, fruit baskets, nut baskets, gourmet chocolates, gourmet cookies, plants, wreaths, organic cotton apparel, organic towels, and organic linens. All of these products are certified eco-friendly and/or provide for environmental benefits through participation in Carbon Offset programs.

Local food co-ops and health food stores often carry organic, locally-grown flowers these days. Hard to find in the northern climates but High Tunnel Greenhouse and Hoop House Greenhouses are changing that. With these new techniques, growing flowers year round without the need for artificial heat is possible.

If you and your love truly love good, healthy food take him/her to a slow foods dinner in your area! Slow Food is an idea, a way of living and a way of eating. It is a global, grassroots movement with thousands of members around the world that links the pleasure of food with a commitment to community and the environment. Good food is the language of love so delicious slow food is about the sexiest thing you can give! Slow Food promotes the celebration of food as a cornerstone of pleasure, culture and community. Find a local chapter near you by visiting the Slow Food USA website.

Many chefs and restaurants support and promote slow food, organic and locally-grown from farms, gardens and wineries near you. Look for them in your area. California isn’t the only place that produces quality wine these days. Many regions, even cold climates are successfully growing varietals appropriate for their regions. In fact, there are numerous wineries in Minnesota now!

Considering sexy new lingerie or other clothes for your sweetie? Eco-friendly bamboo is the most sustainable of natural fibers. It grows fast, requires little water, needs no pesticides, and can reach a height of 75 feet in two months. Fair Indigo and Maggies Organics are pioneers in the field of sustainable, pesticide-free clothing. Fair Indigo is a company wholly committed to making a difference in the fashion industry by creating eco-friendly and organic clothing that is made in keeping with fair trade principles. After researching cotton and learning that it is grown on 3-5% of the world’s cultivated land, and yet uses nearly 10% of the world’s pesticides and 25% of the world’s insecticides, Maggie’s Organics committed themselves to utilizing organic cotton to tell the real story behind conventional cotton clothing. Your best option is to find locally-owned clothing stores that sell these items or products designed by local artists. Check out Peta’s Shopping Guide to Compassionate Clothing for a list of dozens of cruelty-free, vegan companies.

Red Floral Bamboo Tee from Fair Indigo

A romantic Stay-Cation is a vacation that is spent at one’s home enjoying all that home and one’s home environs have to offer. It’s an alternative to pricey, stressful vacations and is more ecologically friendly as less energy is needed to travel locally. Star-gazing and a walk in the woods are romantic and can be done very close to home. Without going far you can find locally-owned accommodations – inns, B&Bs, home exchanges, etc. Wisconsin leads the nation in production of artisan and farmstead cheeses, thanks to the work of master cheesemakers around the state. On the WI B&B website you can carve out a culinary tour based around these small-batch cheese delights. The Minnesota B&B Association offers chocolate tours along the St. Croix River Valley. If you are an Eskimo you might want to stay cozy at one of Inns North which include 21 hotels, 19 in Nunavut and 2 in the NWT, owned by the aboriginal people of Northern Canada.

Do some research – there are lots of other organizations and indie businesses that offer staycation specials. The Cedar Cultural Center in Minneapolis offers stay-cation programs that promote 2 for 1 concerts – you can give your sweetie a whole season of beautiful music!

Here’s wishing you a beautiful Valentine’s Day! – Travel Momma

Posted in art, Buy-local, Fair Trade, food and wine, Slow Foods, travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Black Salt or Kala Namak

Posted by deborahmclaren on January 1, 2011

Several friends have recently been searching for black salt. What the heck is it? Where do you buy it? Why would you want it?

Apparently it is used a lot in Indian cooking. Kala Namak or Black Salt is a special type of Indian mineral salt. When ground into the small crystals or powder, it actually changes color to pink. It has a very distinctive sulfurous mineral taste (like hard boiled egg yolks).

Black Salt or Kala Namak

Its smell is mainly due to sulfur content. Kala namak consists primarily of sodium chloride and trace impurities of sodium sulfate, iron sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide.

Sodium chloride provides kala namak with its salty taste, iron sulphide provides its dark violet hue, and all the sulphur compounds give kala namak its slight bitter taste as well as a highly distinctive smell, with hydrogen sulphide being the most prominent contributor to the smell. Vegan chefs have made this salt popular for adding in eggy flavor to dishes like tofu scrambles. Kala Namak is used in authentic Indian cooking, and popular in mango smoothies.

Indian black salt is not to be confused with Hawaiian black salt, smoked sea salt or “black salt” used in Wiccan ceremonies (for jinx removing). Black rock salts are mined in several parts of the world, including Hawaii, Utah, Bolivia, the Murray-Darling basin of Australia, Peru, and Poland are marketed as Himalayan salt or pink salt. The color results from iron oxide.

Indian black salt comes from the Himalayan Mountains and has been used for centuries in Indian cuisine as cooking and finishing salt. In addition to the supreme taste it also has some exceptional health benefits. In India black salt is recommended for people with high blood pressure and to people who are on low-salt diets, because it is lower in sodium and does not increase sodium content in the blood. It is also know for comforting intestinal gas and heartburn. It is believed to help with indigestion. It is also considered a cooling spice in ayurvedic medicine which uses this salt as a digestive. Great on: yogurt and cheese Exceptional on summer favorites such as cucumbers, watermelon and mangoes.

It’s about $4 dollars per 6 ounces.

More recently, large crystal rocks are also used as Salt lamps. A salt lamp is a lamp carved from a larger salt crystal, often colored, with an incandescent bulb or a candle inside. The lamps give an attractive glow and are suitable for use as nightlights or for ambient mood lighting.

salt lamp

Ayurvedic Properties: It pacifies Vata and increases Pitta and Kapha. It contributes the salty taste and has a heating quality.

In ayurveda, black salt is considered an aid to digestion. Ground with ajwain and lemon juice and eaten, black salt helps balance the digestion. A couple of pinches of black salt and 1/8 tsp. dry-roasted ground cumin can be used to make digestive lassi. Black salt, with lemon and cliantro, is used to make a dressing for spicy fruit salsa or chick-pea salads.

Posted in food and wine | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Culinary Sanctuaries – Crete

Posted by deborahmclaren on November 15, 2010

This is such a great opportunity to visit Crete (partial scholarships available) that I have to post this message from Nikki Rose!

Date: 11/15/2010
Subject: News from Crete -

Hi Deborah!

I hope all is well.

FYI, news from our fields:

Archaeological Institute of America Magazine.
Interview with Nikki Rose: The Joy of Cretan Cooking
November 9, 2010, by Eti Bonn-Muller

Chef-instructor Nikki Rose talks about the importance of protecting Crete’s natural and cultural resources—and how “green” the Minoans really were. Nikki is Founder of Crete’s Culinary Sanctuaries Eco-Agritourism Network in Crete, Greece. Educational programs celebrating cultural and natural heritage.

The full interview: http://www.archaeological.org/news/aianews/3303

AND — one way for you to visit us in Crete! Partial Scholarships available for our 2011 Open Programs. Deadline to apply is December 1st. Information is on our Schedule page below. Space is limited. Great scholarship opportunities for professional researchers. Also a great opportunity to research sustainable tourism in action.

http://www.cookingincrete.com/Schedule.html

All the best,
Nikki

View/reply to this message:

http://www.linkedin.com/e/-ifxnyw-ggja171b-6b/Jmg7xMl1tevx7Oq25rUqMuiS/mbi/I8914476_15/

Posted in cultural heritage, food and wine, green travel, Slow Foods, sustainable tourism, sustainable travel, travel, wild food | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

15 recipes for Thanksgiving beverages

Posted by deborahmclaren on November 15, 2010

Wild Turkey

1 ) Apple Pear Cider

Ingredients
* 1 gallon apple cider
* 2 Bartlett pears, washed, cut into wedges
* 4 cinnamon sticks
* 1 Teaspoon ground ginger
* Hazelnut Liqueur
Directions
* Place cider, pears, cinnamon sticks and ginger in a large pot. Bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes.
* Using a slotted spoon, remove cinnamon sticks. Keep cider in pot over low flame on stove for guests to help themselves. Let people add their own hazelnut liquor so children can drink the virgin apple-pear cider.

2 ) Apple Cider Sparkle
* 6 cups apple cider
* 2 cups cranberry/raspberry cocktail (orange juice, orange-mango or your favorite juice blend)
* 1 bottle (750 mL) champagne (or sparkling wine) (or sparkling juice for non-alcahol)
* 1/2 cup lemon juice

In punch bowl, large pitcher, or even several pitchers, combine apple cider, orange juice, and lemon juice. Just before your guests arrive, slowly add champagne or sparkling wine. Serve immediately or keep chilled with large ice blocks. Makes about about 15 servings of 6 ounces each.

3 ) Pumpkin Pie
* 1 part kahlua
* 1 part spiced pumpkin pie filling
* 2 parts coconut rum
* 4 parts cold milk
* 6 ice cubes
* Garnish with cinnamon

Put everything but the cinnamon in a blender. Mix on high. Sprinkle the top of glasses with cinnamon sugar, fill and serve.

4 ) Smashing Pumpkin Spice
* 1 part Hazelnut liquer
* 1 part Irish Crème
* 1 part Kahlua
* Cinnamon candies
* Sprinkle pumpkin pie spice

Drop 3-4 cinnamon candies in the bottom of a martini glass. Mix the Hazelnut, Irish Crème, and Kahlua in a martini shaker with ice. Strain into a martini glass and sprinkle pumpkin pie spice on top.

5 ) Pumpkin Pie
* 1 part kahlua
* 1 part spiced pumpkin pie filling
* 2 parts coconut rum
* 4 parts cold milk
* 6 ice cubes
* Garnish with cinnamon

Put everything but the cinnamon in a blender. Mix on high. Sprinkle cinnamon on top.

6 ) Gingersnap
* ½ part ginger brandy
* 1 part spiced rum
* 4 parts eggnog
* Crumbled gingersnaps

Put your gingersnaps in a blender and grind until you have cookie crumbs. Use the cookies to rim highball glasses. Mix the eggnog, rum, and brandy in your glasses. Serve with an intact gingersnap for dunking.

7 ) Royal Cider Grog
* 6 parts apple cider
* 1 part Crown Royal
* Cinnamon sticks

Warm the apple cider in a mug. Top it with the Crown Royal and stir with a cinnamon stick.

8 ) Malibu Baked Apple
* 2 parts coconut rum
* 2 parts cranberry juice
* 3 parts apple juice
* Dried apple rings

Mix all 3 in a microwave safe glass and heat until toasty warm. Garnish with a dried apple ring.

9 ) Rock Gobbler
* 1 part Wild Turkey
* 2 parts Cranberry Juice
* 2 parts Chambord
* 2 parts Amaretto

Mix everything in a cocktail shaker full of ice then strain into a highball glass. Garnish with a wedge of lime.

10 ) Cranberry Ginger Martini

2 tsp. grated ginger
8 cranberries (fresh or frozen)
4 oz. cranberry vodka
Splash of lime juice
Splash of cranberry juice
Splash of simple syrup (dissolve one part sugar in one part boiling water; let cool)
Splash of Sprite
Garnish: lemon twist

Muddle ginger and cranberries in a shaker. Add ice, vodka, both juices, and simple syrup. Shake well. Strain into a martini glass, and add Sprite. Garnish with lemon twist.

11 ) Mulled Wine
Ingredients
2 bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon
1/2 cup brown sugar
12 whole cloves
4 cinnamon sticks
2 cups port (a sweet Portuguese wine)
2 cups brandy
Directions
Combine all the ingredients, except the port and brandy, into a large copper or cast-iron pot (not aluminum). Simmer while stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes.

Add port and brandy. Heat for 30 seconds. Pour all into a large heat-resistant bowl or leave it in the pot.

12 ) Hot Buttered Cranberry
8 ounces Cranberry Juice Cocktail OR Cranberry Apple Juice Drink
1 piece stick cinnamon
3 teaspoons brown sugar
dash ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons butter
2 tablespoons gold rum
Directions:

Heat cranberry juice cocktail or cranberry apple drink and cinnamon stick in small saucepan. Put brown sugar, ground cinnamon, butter and rum in a mug. Pour hot cranberry mixture into mug. Stir gently before serving.

Makes 1 serving.

13 ) Burnt Turkey
* 2 oz Wild Turkey Bourbon
* 2 oz Cinnamon Schnapps
* 8-10 fresh mint leaves

Preparation
Fill a chilled glass with crushed ice and 8-10 fresh mint leaves. Combine the bourbon and cinnamon schnapps in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake, then strain over ice.
.
14 ) Ragpur Cran
* 1.3 oz. Tanqueray Rangpur Gin
* 3 oz. cranberry juice
* 1 wedge lime(s)
Drink Recipe Preparation:
* Add cranberry juice to Tanqueray Rangpur and stir.
* Serve over ice.
* Garnish with a lime wedge.

15 ) A Toast to Hunter S. Thompson
Bottle of Wild Turkey
glass
cheers!

Posted in food and wine, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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